Tourist Guide
 Getting Oriented
 

Estonian
Tourist
Guide

Tallinn:
An Introduction

Vitals
Quotables
Estonians
Eesti
Language
Estonia Misconceptions

Getting Oriented
Taxis
Info Points 
Money 
Time
Telephones
City Transit
Post Office
Emergencies
Medical Help
Other Tips

Bars
Wine Cellars

What’s to Drink
Cigar Lounges
Off the Beaten 
        Track
 Bands


Cafés
Cybercafés

Deliveries

Cultural Life
Art Galleries
Museums
Performing Arts
Movie Theaters
Reading
Luminaries

Estonian History

Exercise/Sports

Hotels
 

High End
Mid Range
Low Budget
Dirt Cheap    
Apartment Rental  
Spa Hotels   
Getaways

Real Estate

Maps

Estonia
Tallinn 

Nightclubs
Rave/Dance Music

Restaurants

American-style
Caucasian
Chinese
Estonian
French
German
Hungarian
Indian
International
Italian
Japanese
Medieval
Russian
Seafood
Thai
Turkish
Fast Food/Delivery

Shopping
Shopping Tips
Stores and Malls
Groceries
Bakeries
Handicrafts
Open Markets
Antiques
Clothes
Record Stores
Computer Stores
Souvenirs


Sights
Tartu

Travel
Driving
Planes
Car Rental
Helicopter 
Buses and Trains
Boats and Ferries
Travel Agents
Distances


What's New

What's On


Yellow Pages

Additional phone numbers, 
from shoe repair to embassies.
  - Online Phone Directory



Other Estonian
tourist articles:
 


Prangli Island

Tallinn’s Soviet, Nazi
 Occupations Museum


Top 10 Misconceptions 
   About Estonia 

Tartu: Estonia's 2nd
   City

Top Estonian Bands


Estonian Epic

Estonian-Finnish
   Orchestra

Tallinn’s New Airport


Tallinn by Helicopter

Gone Fishin' in Estonia


Tallinn's SovietLand Park


Wine: A Baltic Guide


Eurovision 2002 in Tallinn
 

Tidbits


Latvian Guide

Lithuanian Guide

Links


Arrival
  Taxis   Info Points   Money   Time   Telephones   City Transit   Post Office   Emergencies Medical Help   Other Tips

Arrival

There’s no reason to be intimidated at the thought of arriving in Tallinn and quickly getting to where you need to go; getting out, when that time comes, is just as manageable. The airport, bus and train stations are smallish, rarely ever crowded and increasingly passenger friendly—especially the airport.
Customs and passport procedures at the airport rarely take more than a few minutes, but can take over an hour at the harbor. While road borders are less predictable—they too have vastly improved, and are getting better all the time. 

To and From the Airport—Tallinn’s airport (or lennujaam) is spectacularly modern, user friendly, and small—so finding almost everything is a no brainer. After massive renovations recently, it now boasts several lovely business-class lounges, with computer/Internet facilities.
The airport is a mere 3 km from the city center—about 10 minutes by car or bus—so you don’t have to sweat if you’re running a little late.
Car rental companies
are on the ground floor, just where the main entrance opens to the parking lot. Taxis are the least complicated way to get to where you’re staying (see TAXIS below); a taxi to the city center costs the equivalent of about four dollars. Bus #2 leaves the airport, from just in front of the departures hall, every 20 minutes and costs less than a euro—it stops at the Sokos Hotel Viru, in the city center and right next to the old city. 
Airport Information
is on the first floor, across from the check-in counters—they can help you with any inquiries. The airport also has a 24-hour info telephone at tel. 605-8888; also see www.tallinn-airport.ee.

To and From Tallinn Harbor—Tallinn’s ever expanding, high-tech passenger harbor (or reisisadam) has four separate terminals, A through D. A, B and C are on the north side of a water inlet, and D on the other side; all have bag storage services that cost less than the equivalent of a dollar for 24 hours. Buses #92 and 90 stop here and can take you further into the heart of the city center; but the old city is only three or four blocks away, so walking is a credible option.
Some speed boats leave from another harbor behind the Linnahall building several blocks away the main passenger harbor. The old city is a skip and a hop away from it, too.
Taxis are the easiest option to get to or from these harbors—but prices can get jacked up on the unsuspecting arrivee.
There’s also a tram stop a short walk from both harbor areas, on Rannamäe tee. Take any of them heading southeast to get into the city center; just go a stop or two.

To and From the Train station—The train station (or rongijaam) is literally across the street from the old city. The train station hasn’t come nearly as far as the airport, and services still can leave something to be desired. A case in point is that they haven’t had a bag storage service for a while, though—that could change given the obvious need. There’s an information desk in the main hallway (tel. 615-6851)—which looks towards the old city. Walk across the main Rannamäe tee road (through the underpass, though) and head up Nunne street, which will take you into the heart of the old city. You can also take several trams at stops just next to the station to the north; take any heading to the northwest and go three or four stops—they’ll deliver you to the city center.

Taxis

A taxi (or takso) from one point in the city center to another should never cost more than 50 or 60 kroons. There are still some dishonest taxi drivers, so a few tips: make sure there’s a visible meter in the taxi, that it works, and that the driver turns it on. The driver should also have his registration, complete with photo and stamps, prominently displayed. Also make sure you’re not charged the evening rate during the day.
Ordering cabs by phone is mostly trouble free; many dispatchers speak English, and you can get your message across to the ones that don’t.

The better taxi companies:
Linnatakso: tel.644-2442 or 1242. 
Silver Takso: tel. 15222 or 627-8850. 
Tulika Takso: tel. 1200 from any phone.
Velotaxi: tel. 508-8810. Efficient friendly bicycle taxis in the city center. Operates seasonally.   

Info Points

The Tallinn Tourist Information Center is in the old city at Kullassepa 4 / Niguliste 2 (I-2), tel. 645-7777, fax 645-7778; their e-mail is turismiinfo@tallinnlv.ee; their website is www.tourism.tallinn.ee. There’s also an info point at the A Terminal in the harbor, tel. 631-8321. Also, try the Tourist Board’s website www.visitestonia.com; e-mail info@visitestonia.com; tel. 699-0420. You can get detailed information about accommodation in the countryside and different activities from Maaturism, tel. 600-9999; www.maaturism.ee

Money

Estonia launched its currency in 1992—the first ex-Soviet subject to ditch the ruble. The kroon (around 15 kroons to 1 euro) has remained stable. Credit cards are now widely accepted; traveler’s checks aren’t, but banks cash them. Big Mac Index: a Big Mac in Estonia is the equivalent of about 1 US dollar 50 cents; a bottle of beer’s around 50 cents and a standard loaf of bread is about 30-40 cents.

Time

Estonia is on Eastern European Time, two hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time in winter and three hours in summer. A good website that always has the right Estonian time, plus Estonia’s time relative to other countries, is www.worldtimeserver.com.

Telephones

The phone system’s quite reliable. For dialing details, plus more numbers, see YELLOW PAGES on this site. For pay phones, you’ll need a phone card; buy them at kiosks, post offices and some stores.

Post Office

Tallinn’s Central Post Office is at Narva mnt. 1 (I-4); it’s very functional and centrally located, tel. 661-6616. There are outlets elsewhere around the city. Postage for cards/letters to Europe is around 6 kroons— 8 kroons to the US and Canada.
       You can also take a look at the Estonian postal service’s website, at www.post.ee.

Emergencies

You dial the same number from all phones, including mobiles, anywhere in Estonia.
For police,
dial 110. Police station is located at Lootsi 15 (B-3), tel. 612-4210.
For the Fire Department
, dial 112.
For ambulances
, dial 112. Emergency centers are at Sütiste 19 in Mustamäe, tel. 697-1100; and Ravi 18 (C-3), tel. 620-7040.

Medical Help

Tallinn Central Hospital: (C-3) Ravi 18, tel. 602-7015.
Mustamäe Hospital:
Sütiste tee 19, tel. 697-1400.
Tallinn Children Hospital:
Tervise 28, tel. 697-4113 or 697-7194. 24h.

Private clinics
are service-friendly, the quality of care tends to be higher, but not always equipped for emergencies: 
CityMed:
(H-4) Ahtri 8, tel. 661-6333, info@citymed.ee. A modern health and beauty center. The only one in Estonia that has an international ISO9002 quality standard. Dental care, plastic surgery, heart diagnostics, stress and other treatments. www.citymed.ee
ESMED
: Ehitajate tee 137, tel. 657-9118. 
Medicover:
Gonsiori 33 (C-4), tel. 605-1500. www.medicover.ee 
Medisfäär:
(B-3) Karu 17, tel. 662-3700.
Maxilla:
(B-4) Hobujaama 4, tel. 667-4174. Dental care. www.maxilla.ee 
Eurodent:
(C-4) Tartu mnt. 63, tel. 611-5551. Dental care. www.eurodent.ee 

In an emergency, Finnish Keskiuudenmaan Sairankuljetus can provide transportation to Finland and back, tel. (358) 400- 463-875.

Other Tips

Familiarizing yourself with gender designations will help to avoid embarrassment as you head to a bathroom: an N or pyramid means a women’s toilet; an M or upside down pyramid means it’s for men. The N stands for naine (woman); an M is for mees (man).

Pedestrians should walk defensively. Don’t expect cars to yield at crosswalks.

Crime shouldn’t be a huge concern. But caution’s advisable. There’s some auto theft; at night, keep your car in a guarded lot.

Hitchhiking’s fairly safe. If you’re Riga- or Pärnu-bound, start way out on Pärnu mnt., past the Nõmme suburb. If you’re going to Tartu, the road running by the airport is a good bet. To Narva, go to Peterburi tee, a bit beyond the Susi hotel. 

Arrival  Taxis   Info Points   Money  Time   Telephones   City Transit   Post Office   Emergencies Medical Help  Other Tips 
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—CITY PAPER-The Baltic States



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