Tourist Guide
 Real Estate
 

Lithuanian 
Tourist 
Guide


Vilnius:
An Introduction

Getting Oriented
 
Arrival
 -  Taxis
 -  Info Points
 -  Money
 -  Time
 -  Emergencies
 -  Medical Help
 -  Tips

Bars
What's to Drink
Cafés
Deliveries
 
Culture

History
Hotels 

 High End
 -  Mid Range   
-   Airport
 -  Bed&Breakfast
 -  Low Budget
 - 
On the Cheap
 - Apartment Rental
Real Estate
Map
 - Lithuania
Vilnius

Nightclubs
 - Rave/Dance Music
Restaurants

-   Argentinean  
-   Caucasian

 -  Chinese  
 -  French 
 -  International 
-   Greek
 -  Italian 
 -  Japanese 
 -  Lithuanian    
 -  Ukrainian  
 -  Vegetarian

-  Fast Food/Delivery
Shopping
Sights
-   Klaipeda
Travel
What's New
What's On
Yellow Pages

Other Lithuanian-related 
tourist articles: 
Letter from Little Lithuania
The Stalin World Theme Park 
Magical Curonion Spit

Zappamania in Lithuania
Jewish Vilnius
Ghosts and Goblins
Lithuanian Jazz
Wine: A Baltic Guide
What's in a name?
The Anyksciai Grove

Tidbits

Estonian Guide

Latvian Guide

Links

 

 

 


Buying 

2600 new residential units were built in Vilnius in 2004, most all of them sold before they were finished. 
The best advice is to find a broker you like and believe in. The broker will serve more to help you avoid surprises than he’ll negotiate for you: in this region the asking price is very similar to the selling price. For detailed information, we recommend you read City Paper’s Real Estate Guide for Foreigners.

Brokers

This is a partial listing of brokers City Paper readers have used and been pleased with in the past. It is by no means complete.
Baltic Real Estate: Ðvitrigailos 3, tel. 215-0436
Ober-Haus: Geleþinio Vilko 18a, tel. 210-9700
Pro Kapital: Didþioji 39/1, tel. 266-0800

Finance

Concerning banks, there are the usual suspects available in any phone book. But don’t forget the Baltic-American Mortgage Company, a foreign-funded mortgage company (Kalinausko g. 2b, tel. 262-9400, www.bustopaskolos.lt). They are real professionals and often overlooked by foreigners in the region.

Renting

For those in need of long-term rentals there are many options, the most obvious of which is to look in the newspaper. Dealing directly with an apartment’s owner may save you money, but beware you run the risk of surprises. It’s better than it used to be, but apartment owners occasionally will not see it as your apartment. Make sure you find out if the owner plans to enter the apartment when you’re not there, whether he’ll allow you to employ a cleaning service, whether you’ll have to pay rent in cash, whether you’ll be required to pay a broker you never used, just to name a few.
If you have the money, employ a rental agency (see rental agencies) to vet the apartments for you. They’ll remove the element of surprise, there won’t be hidden costs, and the owner won’t show up one day to interview you about what cleaning products you’re using on his floor. Brokers will typically charge one-half to one month’s rent as a commission, regardless the length of the lease signed. 

Rental agencies

See Apartment Rental in City Paper’s Staying the Night section. Most also deal with long-term rentals. 


                     —CITY PAPER-The Baltic States



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